Frequently Asked Questions

About the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office
             

What is the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office?
The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office was established by the Victorian Government to drive economic development in the Precinct and strengthen its position as a world leader in biomedical research, development and innovation. It works in collaboration with the Precinct Partners, and government at all levels to achieve its goals.

Why has the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office been established?
The Premier’s Jobs and Investment Panel recognised the importance of the Precinct to Victoria’s future economy. In its 2016 report, the Panel recommended further investment to strengthen governance and drive economic development in the Precinct to help increase its economic contribution.

What does it do?
The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office has four key roles across strategic planning, advisory, promotion and implementation.

Read more about the role in the Terms of Reference here.

What will it deliver?
The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office will deliver two significant pieces of strategic work in 2017-18, to shape the focus for the Precinct over the next 20-30 years.

The first is a Strategic Plan for the Precinct developed in collaboration with our Precinct Partners and Government. This plan will identify the priorities for the state over the next 20 years and make recommendations for actions and investment to maximise the potential of the Precinct.

Secondly, the MBP Office are working with the Victorian Planning Authority to develop a Framework Plan for the Precinct. Melbourne is growing at a rapid rate and as such the Framework Plan will work towards ensuring the Precinct is well equipped to manage and leverage this growth in the future. You can read more about the Framework Plan here.

How is it funded?
The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office receives its funding from the Victorian Government.

Who leads the team?
The Executive Chair is Dr Gareth Goodier who has a career spanning more than 35 years in health practice, consulting and leadership as CEO of major academic hospitals both in Australia and internationally, including the Royal Melbourne Hospital and Cambridge University Hospitals. He leads a team of advisors and project managers, experienced in public sector and health strategy development, policy and planning.

Where is the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office located?
The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office is located right in the heart of the Precinct, close to the Precinct Partners and their work.

About the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct

 

What is the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct?
The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct is recognised as Australia’s, and one of the world’s, leading biomedical precincts.

Through its 30 Precinct Partners, it delivers outstanding clinical care, education, and produces world-class biomedical research. It excels particularly in child and adolescent health, cancer, mental health and neurosciences, infectious diseases, and healthy ageing. Both individually and collectively these organisations are globally recognised for their innovation and outstanding patient outcomes.

The Precinct employs tens of thousands of people including 10,000 researchers, with about 7,000 biomedical health and medical students. It consistently attracts around 23% of Australia’s annual competitive biomedical research funding, more than any other cluster in Australia, and has a publication citation rate twice the international average.

What are the standout achievements of the Precinct?
The Precinct is home to many firsts – Melbourne’s first general hospital, as well as the state’s first specialist hospitals in children’s health, women’s health and eye, ear, nose and throat care. It also the site of Melbourne’s first and Australia’s leading university, the University of Melbourne; Australia’s largest pharmaceutical company, CSL; and Australia’s oldest medical research institute, the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute.

The Precinct has made major discoveries across microbiology, immunology and neurology. The bionic ear was discovered and developed in the Precinct, as was rotavirus and the world’s first paediatric vaccine for gastroenteritis.

Which organisations are in the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct?
Collectively the Precinct Partners have been delivering first class medical care, research and education in Victoria for more than 160 years. They are the names you know – big hospitals, universities and research institutes that have fundamentally improved patient outcomes here and internationally. There are 30 Precinct Partners (read more here).

What areas of Melbourne are covered by the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct?
The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct is made up of 30 hospitals, medical research institutes, biotechnology organisations and universities largely collocated to the north of Melbourne’s CBD in the area extending from East Melbourne, Parkville, Carlton and North Melbourne to Royal Park in the north.

The reach of the Precinct goes beyond its geographical boundaries with collaborations with other universities, hospitals and research organisations throughout Victoria, Australia and the world.

In particular the Precinct works with other clusters around Monash, Deakin, LaTrobe and Swinburne universities and the Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct in Victoria.

What value does the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct bring to Victoria?
Collectively the Precinct Partners employ tens of thousands of people, including 10,000 researchers, with about 7,000 biomedical, health and medical students located in the Precinct.

 

The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Strategic Plan

 

What will the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Strategic Plan cover?
The Strategic Plan identifies strategic priorities and actions for both Government and the Precinct Partners to achieve the Precinct’s vision over the next 20 years.

The priorities have been identified in the context of existing Government strategies and plans, the strengths of the Precinct, as well as the opportunity to capitalise on its research capabilities. The Precinct Partners will work together to build a culture that prioritises and recognises the impact and value commercialisation can deliver.

 

The Framework Plan

 

What is the Framework Plan?
The Framework Plan is a high-level planning tool that will coordinate, guide and inform the preparation and consideration of more detailed local plans and planning permit applications. It’s about making the most of space and place in the Precinct. A key aim of the Framework Plan is to create diverse, affordable, compact and well-connected communities that are rich in local jobs, transport access, services and culture.

What will the Framework Plan include?
The Framework Plan will include a land-use vision for the Precinct, as well as the projects, infrastructure and steps required to manage and support growth over the next 30 years. It will provide a guide to sustainable growth, as well as a more certain environment for making both public and private investment decisions. The Framework Plan will build on the strategic work of the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office and assist government in making best use of its assets and help identify future investment priorities.

Why does Melbourne Biomedical Precinct need a Framework Plan?
Melbourne is growing at a rapid rate and many significant projects are underway that impact upon land use and amenity in this area, including the Metro Tunnel which will see new stations in Parkville and Arden.

The Framework Plan will build on these opportunities to ensure the area is developed to maximise its potential as a world class centre for medical care, research and education.

Who is developing it?
The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office and the Victorian Planning Authority are jointly leading this important piece of work.  We will work closely with the Victorian Government and its agencies, as well as the City of Melbourne, the Precinct Partners and the community.

How does the Framework Plan align with other Government work?
The Framework Plan supports the vision of Plan Melbourne, and recommendations of the Premier’s Jobs and Investment Panel, which both recognise the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct as a high-potential area for the growth of high-skill, high-wage jobs in the future.

 

Committees and Structure

 

What is role of the Precinct Leadership Group?
The concept of collaboration is not new to the Precinct. In 2012, the CEOs of the major hospitals and research institutions in the area joined with the University of Melbourne, as well as CSL and CSIRO, to form what is now known as the Precinct Leadership Group.

It has grown organically over time and now, with the establishment of the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office, plays a key leadership and advisory role to the Executive Chair and his team.

The Precinct Leadership Group is chaired by Dr Gareth Goodier.

Who is on the Precinct Leadership Group?
The Precinct Leadership Group is made up of the biggest and most influential health care, research and education institutions in the Precinct. These organisations have a combined influence second to none in the Australian health sector and they play an active role in not only the development of the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Strategic Plan and Framework Plan, but also ultimately in its delivery. Together, they will drive the necessary cultural change within their organisations to help bring more investment into the Precinct.

 

You can read more about its members here

The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct is recognised as Australia’s, and one of the world’s, leading biomedical precincts.

The Melbourne Biomedical Precinct Office will deliver two significant pieces of strategic work in 2017-18, to shape the focus for the Precinct over the next 20-30 years.